Board & Staff Members

Mary Erickson

Mary Erickson

Co-Founder and Board Chair; she/her/hers

Mary moved to Teton County from rural South Dakota in 2006 with her husband, Bruce, and two children, Adele and Oscar. She grew up in the San Francisco Bay Area, graduated from UC Berkeley with a B.A. in English Literature, and later went on to get a Master of Divinity from Harvard University. Mary became an ordained Episcopal Priest in 2009.

Mary currently serves as an Associate Rector at St. John’s Episcopal Church. For three years, she was the Executive Director of Coombs Outdoors, and previously served as the Executive Director of One22. She is known in the community as a vocal advocate for social justice, seeking always to come from a foundation of love, respect, and compassion, combined with a healthy dose of righteous indignation. Mary studied community organizing with the Industrial Areas Foundation in Chicago, founded by the father of community organizing, Saul Alinsky, and made famous again for launching the career of a young Barack Obama.

The Erickson family is blessed to own a home in East Jackson, and Mary never forgets what an extraordinary privilege housing security is in Jackson. While at One22, she came to understand that housing insecurity is the primary cause of crisis and instability for members of our community, so she helped to co-found Shelter JH with friends Jorge Moreno and Skye Schell. Shelter JH was founded with the traditional community organizing philosophy that real change can happen through focused, committed grassroots advocacy and organizing.

Skye Schell

Skye Schell

Co-Founder and Board Secretary; he/him/his

Skye got involved in housing advocacy in Brooklyn NY in the early 2000s, working first as a case manager in a soup kitchen and then in street outreach, building relationships with people living on the street and working with them to obtain supportive housing through the Housing First model. He later worked on a variety of pro-housing campaigns in the greater Seattle area while working at a land trust and as a volunteer on the Great City non-profit board.

Skye came to Jackson in 2014 to lead civic engagement work at the Jackson Hole Conservation Alliance. He joined the Teton County Housing Authority board in 2015 and served until it was dissolved by the County Commission. After seeing a severe gap in political will to build homes for all our community members and workers, Skye joined with a few other passionate locals to start ShelterJH - a membership-based 501c4 that can get political.

Skye currently runs the Alliance and believes strongly that our community (and our country) can and must support both conservation and community values. When not working he enjoys being outside with friends, family, and his dog Luna.

Mike Welch

Mike Welch

Board Treasurer; he/him/his

Mike has lived in Jackson Hole for almost 30 years, after first visiting as a teen in the 1980’s and then moving here permanently after college at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, CA. Working for several valley non-profits and small businesses over the years, Mike has most recently moved into part-time project and consulting work, allowing him much more time to spend with his family.

An advocate by nature, Mike strongly believes that encouraging community engagement from a broad range of people across the demographic spectrum is a key component that will continue to keep Jackson Hole a vibrant and healthy community. His involvement with local non-profits as both employee and board member over the last decades, and his work on several friends’ campaigns for elected office, have only deepened his belief that involvement in the political process is something that should be encouraged for all of us.

Mike’s family includes his wife Diana and two sons Bode and Malcolm. They all bike, ski, canoe, camp and travel together, while maintaining a daily connection with the environment in this incredible place. Mike and Diana are raising their sons in a home purchased through Teton County’s affordable housing program more than 20 years ago, and will continue to support community affordable housing efforts like those that ShelterJH advocates.

Ryan Nourai

Ryan Nourai

Board Development Chair

Ryan spent the formative years of his childhood and adolescence in Southern California, Palos Verdes to be exact. Those years were spent near the ocean, becoming educated in pop culture and rock ‘n’ roll, while dreaming of the Great American West. He attended Marymount California University where he received a B.A. in Liberal Arts, dabbling in a myriad of studies and concentrations. During those years he traveled as much as possible, domestically and internationally.

Moving to Jackson much earlier in life than he had expected, Ryan initially fled every winter, only to stick around year-round because of his fondness for the energetic community. Since his first day living in Jackson, he had been volunteering or working within the non-profit arena in Jackson; it was immediately obvious that Jackson suffered from a housing problem. Efforts such as “Wildlife Crossings” and “Save the Block” allowed Ryan to put down roots and come into contact with more and more of the firebrands that he sought to know. However, Ryan quickly came to understand that those firebrands could not settle here in Jackson without a paradigm shift and systematic change.

With a hand in many cookie jars, Ryan serves on multiple boards in Jackson, including the Teton ArtLab and the Teton County Historic Preservation Board. In his spare time he writes science-fiction and travels the Southwest. By trade, Ryan considers himself a community organizer.

Ash Hermanowksi

Ash Hermanowksi

Board Member; she/her/hers

Ash grew up and spent most of her life in rural Vermont. She attended the University of Vermont where she completed her BS in Nutrition & Food Sciences and soon after began her career in Food Access & Food Assistance programs. She managed a progressive free meal program for Vermonters in an effort to alleviate some of the struggles they face – unprecedented student debt, unaffordable housing, and stagnant working wages. Through her nonprofit work she has learned that building strong community relationships and putting program participants at the center of implementation, design, and ownership is essential for success in providing services.

Ash moved to Jackson in November 2019 and already has found her place in this new, but familiar, small town scene. In the first summer following her move to Jackson, she led Hole Food Rescue’s Sprout Mobile program, providing over 6,000 free meals to local families and children during the COVID-19 pandemic. Ash and her partner have recently found community and connection among local LGBTQ+ folks. She hopes to begin advocating for queer rights, visibility, and leadership in a state where LGBTQ+ protections are not guaranteed or valued.

As a working parent, Ash has first-hand experience in the persistent issues Teton County families face, such as lack of affordable and stable housing and childcare. Ash believes that these issues are everyone’s issues, not just those who struggle to afford to live here.

Elizabeth Hutchings

Elizabeth Hutchings

Board Member; she/her/hers

Elizabeth grew up with frequently bare feet and perpetually tangled hair exploring the woods and streams of Southeastern Pennsylvania. She attended Northeastern University in Boston where she started two profitable companies and fell in love with the White Mountains. Later, she spent 10 months living out of a backpack across 7 countries.

When she moved out to Jackson three years ago, she recognized that Teton County is a microcosm of the stressors of affordable housing, land development, and zoning challenges that are playing out across the US. She has been a van dweller, forest camper, Idaho commuter, and housing insecure tenant in East Jackson. She has worked for JHMR, a conservation non-profit, multiple restaurants, local business owners, and families who needed childcare. These experiences have shaped her fierce desire to ensure Jackson is a place that a variety of people can afford to live and build a life long term.

Currently, Elizabeth is a business mentor through Silicon Couloir and an affordable housing advocate. She has driven across the state to testify at a State Senate committee, given numerous public comments, and mobilized locals to give comment and vote. She fights for those who call Jackson home but continue to struggle with a house.

In her free time you can find her swimming long distances, shutting down the dance floor, writing, and enjoying a variety of uphill athletics.

Clare Stumpf

Clare Stumpf

Coordinator; she/her/hers

Clare Stumpf grew up in Oakland, California. For reasons beyond her, she left the sunny West Coast and attended the University of Rochester in upstate New York where she earned a B.A. in psychology and philosophy. She moved to Jackson after graduation for “one fun summer” and has spent every summer in the valley since working as a raft guide and living in her van.

After a few winter seasons globe-hopping, Clare decided to return to school and moved to Boulder, Colorado. She earned a M.S. in Environmental Policy from the University of Colorado, where she worked on municipalizing Boulder’s energy supply, registering young voters, and interning for a food justice non-profit.

Clare decided to stay one fall (and luckily found winter housing!) for a local grassroots organizing training program and has lived here full-time ever since working in the non-profit sector. She has traveled to Cheyenne to testify in support of housing mitigation, lobbied Town Councilors and County Commissioners to approve developing homes that locals can afford, and gathered grassroots support for a variety of causes in Jackson Hole.

Living in a van for seven summers has familiarized Clare with the housing challenges so many Jackson locals face and fuels her passion for housing justice. Clare is thankful that she has the opportunity to park her mobile home in this incredible valley while working on critical issues with great friends and colleagues. When Clare is not advocating for responsible planning at northern South Park or recruiting new ShelterJH members, she is probably on the water or daydreaming about post-COVID-19 international ventures.